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Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Boys In A Modern School

I bang on a lot about the wisdom of homeschooling. It is a choice that I heavily promote, and frankly don't understand the continued popularity of public schools given the available data. Objectively, homeschooling results in superior academic performance [pdf]* and permits parents to impart their values, particularly their religion and moral codes, free of State interference and / or liberalist proselytizing. On top of that, it's far, far safer.**  Then there is this article that documents research suggesting that early compulsory school attendance before children are cognitively ready (about age 8-10) actually stunts academic achievement. This effect is particularly acute for boys, who's cognitive development lags that of girls--with the result that a great many boys experience school failure, become delinquent, experience a lower sense of self-worth, suffer from a loss of masculine identity, and develop contempt for women.

So yes, there is much to recommend homeschooling as a superior form of education, especially for boys. Yet I, as a middle-aged Gen Xer, am looking at the homeschool vs private school question from a distance of over two decades. If public school was going downhill back then, what was it for Millennials and what is it now for the generation currently working its way through the gauntlet? This article at MRA London.org [HT: Andy at AV4M] gives us a clue:
My early school years were great, my education was great, I had maximum grades at that point; I played for my school football team and used to do some boxing. My dad and his dad were both boxers, it was great bonding time for me and my dad in the gym. Life couldn't have better, as I got towards the end of my primary school years, I did start to notice an odd trend though, my family seemed to be the minority that were like this, when I'd stay over at friends houses, it'd almost always be divorced mothers or just simply single mothers looking after my friends. I never paid it much attention however as I was just 6-11 years old at the time but I always wondered, "where's your dad?"about my friends.
 Anyway, moving on to my transition into secondary school, this is where things changed, for the worse. Secondary school is 11-16 in England, not sure what it is in other countries.
Immediately it began, we were taught, at such a young age, all of the atrocities western men had committed against everyone else, we were literally, I'm not exaggerating here, taught to be ashamed of ourselves and of our gender culture, girls were taught how great the suffragettes were and that without them they'd still be under the tyranny of evil men, I remember a particular class about this in history before, the female teachers and female students were all laughing at the stupidity of boys and men, I remember the female teacher pointing out "all the men had to fight wars, while women didn't, but it was always men that started the wars!" while the girls all laughed, I remember looking around at all the boys in my class just sitting there, quietly, blank stares on their faces, saying nothing. Then it hit me like a silver bullet, I was doing the same as them: nothing.
 However after having years of political correctness and self-shame pumped into me by this so called education system, I had no knowledge of how to even discredit them, everything they said seemed true, if it wasn't for my father teaching me about the great men of our past at a young age, I actually think I'd be another sad fool indoctrinated into feminist ideology.
[A]fter all this, I noticed something change in me, I became apathetic, lazy, unmotivated and my grades went from the top 5% in my country at age 11, to pretty much, rock bottom. I remember at age 11 I was predicted straight A* and As for my GCSEs. Well, I didn't leave that school with a single GCSE, not one. Why? I stopped caring about school, some days I just didn't turn up, I couldn't take it anymore, it was actually horrendous to be discriminated against like that by people who are supposed to be objectively teaching and nurturing me. By the time my dad noticed what was going on it was too late to do anything about it, was in the last 6 months of school; the school never notified him of my drastic drop in grades and lack of attendance. These feelings weren't just felt by me either, I can tell you now that 90% of the boys in my year didn't leave with more than 1-2 GCSEs either, a lot of the girls, the majority in fact, left that school with amazing grades, a girl I was fond of left with 3 A stars, if I remember correctly. Oh and my sister finished Primary school with high grades and carried on the trend finishing secondary school with very high grades all As and Bs. She went on to do A levels and was on her way to becoming very successful, learning multiple languages such as German and Latin when she decided to give it all up to raise a family.
To any of the older generation out there, I'd just like to tell you, this is what it was like to grow up in an education system from 1997-2006. Now I can't say it was like this in every school, as I had no experience in other schools but if generally speaking, every school was the same way mine was, we're in big trouble.
My big question is, what is going to happen when my generation has to step and live their place in the world? From my experience and the facts around me at the time, the majority of boys in my year are either unemployed or doing basic jobs like stacking shelves, digging and other menial jobs. We've literally created a generation of young men who are self-hating and apathetic without any father figures in their lives and even the ones who had father figures like me, got shafted hard by the education system we had to endure. Honestly, I'm actually really interested in seeing what happens in the next 20 years. Will feminists ever realise that their self-gratification condemns this generation of men who have been destroyed and ostracized with little chance of their life’s potential being developed?
 I was one of the few people who wasn't surprised when the UK Riots came about, it was just waiting to happen, this is the generation of young men who are supposed to be the backbone to our future.
Oh and before anyone accuses me of blaming my failings on the Education system, my father paid for me to go to an all male school, where I got 7 As in GCSEs on my first year there directly after mandatory school ended, then two years of A levels in which I got all 5 of them. This isn't some blame, pity me game, I'm just generally very interested in what you all think is going to happen if my scenario holds true for the majority of young men growing up?
I don't think it bodes well at all.  I have stated many times that the best thing parents could do to ensure the mental and physical health of their boy-children--and their girl-children too--their cognitive and moral development, and their future success in life, is to withdraw them immediately from a masculinity-destroying (and femininity-twisting) Molech.  The alternative is to surrender yet another generation of future men to this machine, this grinder which shaves them down to nubs, aborting their masculine identity and training them to be drones. Little wonder that so many male psyches do not survive this unscathed. When we pair the male survivors of an of/by/for female public school system with the male divestment / disenfranchising experiment our culture seems intent on conducting, and we have a real recipe for trouble.

The definition of insanity is to keep doing the same thing and expecting different results.  Why should we plaintively wonder what is going wrong with our boys and men, stumble upon potential solutions, yet never elect to do something different? That "something different" could be as small--yet have as significant an effect--as what the father of this fellow did.  His father (or uncle, grandfather, older brother, manosphere denizen), took an active, not passive involvement in the education (not just schooling) of his son, and thereby effectively counteracted the feminist propaganda bombardment the son was receiving at school. Yes, his son was a physically a prisoner in school,*** but his mind was freed.  This suggests that the active intervention of elder males can do much to affect the fate of those who come behind.

 * Granted, the homeschooling population is rife with selection effects that affect the intellectual gifting and development of children. The biggest one is that, surprise, homeschooling parents are overwhelmingly married, with all the benefits thereto that the investment of a married mother and father bequeath to their children

** I don't have to worry about my child's teacher raping him, physically abusing him, him being bullied, or being in a dangerous self-defense-free zone.

*** Not sure why this fellow's dad didn't pull him out of public school. Perhaps he lacked the ability to do so...there are those who truly cannot exercise this choice...or maybe the DIY alternative never occurred to him

16 comments:

newrebeluniv said...

So many parents continue to send their kids to public school because they never learned to question authority. Going to public school is just the way things are done. For good or ill, it's something you just have to endure because your parrents did. The best you can hope for is your parents will pick a neighborhood that has a "good school" or they will pony up to send you to a private school that more and more is just a costlier carbon copy of the government run schools (but without black students).

--Hale

Eric said...

"I was one of the few people who wasn't surprised when the UK Riots came about, it was just waiting to happen, this is the generation of young men who are supposed to be the backbone to our future."

Even more telling is the lack of men willing to go in and stop these Wild Young Men. Did the author of this post even consider closing ranks with the other men of the community, to augment the police and put a stop to them? Rather then protect their communities like a "Real Man" should, I'm betting there were a whole lot of "blokes" who just sat by drinking Guiness and eating popcorn laughing. Where have the heros gone? Got me. Until then, send in the Robo-Cunts to stop the looting and the burning; we'll buy you a pint when you're done...

Michael Egan said...

There is an alternative. Both my sons were increasing frustrated by the education offered at our local Big Box school. They're competitive academically, and physically but the school didn't really have the space for them. (According to the school's counselor.) So we sought alternatives; and ended up in an all male Roman Catholic high school.

Expensive? Well, yes but if you have kids that are truly college bound, you're going to pay for their undergraduate degree. We used the high school to pay on the front end. As a result, their loans were minimal, and their scholarships were maximized.

Realistically evaluate where your kids are headed, and search for alternatives. They are out there, but the parents have to search them out.

Christine said...

The worst thing my mother ever did was put my brother and I back into school after homeschooling us for 3 years. I stayed home from 5th-7th grade and re-entered at 8th. Being self taught for 3 years I was unable to take being forced to learn from the book with no ability to move ahead or stay behind. By 11th grade I got a job and quit going because I Was able to better educate myself then the system.

My brother did go on to graduate, but he ended up a drug abuser and still hasn't left home.

My mother also left my dad at the time she decided to put us back into school and refused to make it easy for him to have a relationship with us. I can see the effects it had on my brother as he is just floating around at 26 years old with no real direction in life.

I married a man 22 years older than me because as basically pointed out here the majority of men in my generation haven't learned or been encouraged to be MEN. They are slapped down and ridiculed for trying.

A lot of people I know won't home school because they think they can't handle it or educate their own kids. My husband and I make sure we do all we can so that I can stay home and educate our son, our daughter and our upcoming bundle as well. No way we are letting our kids be taught government values over our own, plus its nice to be able to teach the truth of history and not some padded half truth.

Elusive Wapiti said...

"Going to public school is just the way things are done. For good or ill, it's something you just have to endure because your parrents did. "

In many ways, I think they just lack imagination.

Also, another engine driving public schooling is all those choice mommy families out there...they can't educate their brood properly because (assuming they're not welfare mamas) they themselves are in remunerated employment.

Thus does the Church of Liberalism's Sunday Schools manufacture products who go on whelp offspring out of wedlock and/or undergo a frivorce...therefore reliably shunted toward other CoL Sunday Schools.

It's like Say's Law, for compulsory public education.

Elusive Wapiti said...

@ Eric,

"I'm betting there were a whole lot of "blokes" who just sat by drinking Guiness and eating popcorn laughing. Where have the heroes gone? Got me"

Perhaps this is MGTOW coming home to roost. Men have been sufficiently divested to the point to where not only are they not in the neighborhoods to keep order, they no longer feel obligated to lend a hand.

Not judging, mind you, just stating my observation. It is entirely rational, and on some level, entirely appropriate that they do so. Why should a matrifocal, quasi-matriarchal society receive services it does not appreciate, invest in, or care to receive?

Elusive Wapiti said...

"My mother also left my dad at the time she decided to put us back into school and refused to make it easy for him to have a relationship with us. I can see the effects it had on my brother as he is just floating around at 26 years old with no real direction in life."

I've been pondering the many factors that go into why men are "underperforming" these days relative to women. Part of it I think is investment in girls and women over boys and men (parental girl preference, an array of f-m wealth transfers, AA, divorce leading to matrilinearity, etc), and part of it is the unmooring of men from the home and the antipathy toward a father's relationship with his child(ren) and his role in the home.

I'd be curious to see what you think it is.

"A lot of people I know won't home school because they think they can't handle it or educate their own kids. "

Interesting thing is that, chances are, your average mom and dad are smarter than your standard PS teacher. Their collective IQ is, if memory serves, about the 28th percentile of college attendees. Pretty low bar to clear.

Congrats on the upcoming little one, and linked ya.

Elusive Wapiti said...

"an array of f-m wealth transfers"

Er, that should say "MM-f" wealth transfers.

Christina said...

Interesting thing is that, chances are, your average mom and dad are smarter than your standard PS teacher. Their collective IQ is, if memory serves, about the 28th percentile of college attendees. Pretty low bar to clear.

Believe this hands down. I went to one of the top Florida schools for education (Florida Southern College) and the state of our math department - that primarily catered to those looking to teach math - was abysmal. Graduate work was so above what we were taught, re-taking under-grad classes at the grad school was necessary to even have a chance of success (so stated several math majors that went on for masters degrees).

I tutored several of these Math-Ed people and I can not believe they were going to be handed a piece of paper that said they could educate someone else in the subject.

I'm not going to homeschool - primarily because my husband doesn't want me to. And he gets final say. I've given him the pros and cons and he says school. My oldest enters pre-school at a private school next fall. Until then, I'm teaching what I can.

Two observations I've had while teaching reading:

#1 - Our kids are WAY smarter and way more capable of absorbing new information a lot earlier than we give credit for. For instance, children are not expected to be able to identify letters until pre-school. Thanks to foam letters and his early obsession with playing with them, my son knew their basic sound and name by the time he was 2.5.

#2 - Too much emphasis is given to formal learning. Parents think they need to have lesson plans and sit their kid down to look at a piece of paper. This is probably why we wait til our kids have an attention span over 15 minutes before we try teaching them and why this teaching method so overwhelmingly caters to girls. Learning is done a little bit at a time in a play atmosphere. Who knew I'd be a parent who got sick of picking up foam letters in every room instead of legos?

I would love to homeschool. Currently, our agreement stands that private school until they start to struggle - then we'll teach from home.

I hope he does ok =/

ferlans said...

I can see his point. Such abuse of young boys would generally lead them to perform worse. But they would probably have performed worse in a feminist environment anyway.

When I graduated from secondary school (not in the UK), the girls generally did better than the boys. They put a lot more effort into their education. Part of it was that girls are pushed hard to succeed in order to prove that they were as good as men while the boys had no such incentive. But there was probably more to it.

Lee said...

Graduated HS in '02, went right into the military. I've written about this before, but never from this angle. Your linked post was spot on: guys, as a general rule, can't be made to care about the little details. The organization required of a 16yo to do well in HS is obscene, frankly, and accomplishes nothing but weeding out people who don't learn well that way.

I still recall that many of us men would just sleep through most of our classes, wake up and take a pathetic test, but make a B at best due to our lack of organization (late papers, missed HW assignments, etc). We couldn't be made to care, so we were ignored.

As bad as that was, I came out of the military and went into college, and let me tell you: whatever "revolution" was taking over the public universities is over. You will literally get kicked out of class for blatant republicanism. A recent veteran of the Marine corps, I was told to my face that all marines are "F#$%#D in the head", this by an overweight English 101 teacher who got booted from boot camp for popping on a drug test...

My philosophy teacher was clearly stoned, start to finish. My 23yo "american gov't" teacher(dropped the class after a week) thought a brewing war with Iran was "exciting", and her with a significant other stationed in the Med with the navy.

During orientation, in a large auditorium with a couple hundred freshman, they lectured us about how women should be able to wander around naked and drunk and not be raped. I foolishly opined, in my louder-than-normal NCO voice, that wandering around drunk and naked is a stupid effing idea if you're trying not to get raped. I was literally hissed and screamed at, to the approving smirks of the orientation faculty.

I abandoned orientation after that, still got in. Should have left the college then and there, but paid for three semesters before just throwing in the towel.

Chris said...

Learning is done a little bit at a time in a play atmosphere.
This is empirically refutable by watching those nations that are top performers. Regimented learning is actually more suited to boys if done right. Its the pedagogy that's the problem, not the order foisted.
What our schools do is create the illusion of order under which are winks and nudges allowing the kids to under perform.
Plus, the regimentation is too long, time wasted on more and more things that are less and less meaningful academically, including every sort of diversity/sensitivity/like that , complete with slogans hanging everywhere about fairness and what not.
Homeschooling (we did it for 3 kids up to middle school age, and one until mid-high school) focuses and takes half a day to do academics. Making the helicopter parent mistake is a female tendency that needs restraint from the husband, who may or may not be fully bought in as well.

Uniforms and order. That's a good start.

Elusive Wapiti said...

@ Christina,

"I'm not going to homeschool - primarily because my husband doesn't want me to. And he gets final say. I've given him the pros and cons and he says school."

Bless you for following your husband's lead, and while I absolutely respect his authority as head of his household, I hope he eventually reconsiders.

Not all PSs are bad, and private schools tend to be somewhat better. But the problem, in my observation, lays in both the curriculum taught (privates tend to use the same curriculum and standards as publics) and in the pedagological techniques used. Again, same as publics.

"Our kids are WAY smarter and way more capable of absorbing new information a lot earlier than we give credit for. "

Same here. S3's ability to learn and retain is nothing short of extraordinary. I wonder what happened...he certainly didn't get it from me. lol.

@ Ferlans,

While I wasn't valedictorian in HS, I was darn close. And in the rarified air of overachieving secondary school students (we all went to the same AP classes, etc), girls outnumbered the boys appx 2:1. That was over two decades ago, so this problem isn't a new one. And the problem extended to the activities, too. If it wasn't sports in my HS, young men tended to not be interested.

I'm not sure why the sex ratio was so lopsided. The curriculum wasn't as liberalist-infected as I understand it is now, and nearly half of my teachers were male. And no one forces the children to get good grades or be involved in activities...thus young men vote there interest (or lack thereof) with their feet.

All this suggests to me the problem starts much much earlier.

Elusive Wapiti said...

Lee,

Thinking out loud, I'm wondering if it isn't this somewhat-new invention called "adolescence" that is doing our boys (and girls, although in different more subtle ways) in. Adolescence, as opposed to adults-in-training, plus compulsory Prussion / Hindu-style public schooling and a culture that values and emphasizes the feminine, seems to be spelling trouble for guys and gals.

LOL on your "college" experience. An extension of HS to be sure, and indicative of institutional capture by the Left.

Was listening to the Hannity show last night, and the guest host profiled a 25 yo college-grad homeless man who had lost his job as a fundraiser for a non-profit 3 years ago. He was working at Jack in the Box, and couldn't afford to pay rent...and couldn't even afford to pay rent with 2-3 other roommates.

While the guest host focused on our lack of shelter coverage for "transitional" adults (didn't want to go to traditional homeless shelters for fear of being victimized by the older, hardened homeless, I was thinking about how the entire structure set this fellow up to fail.

From a schooling system that emphasizes poofy academic studies, sure to help with self-actualization and political activism, but not relevant to actually making something, to follow-on "jobs" that don't produce anything, I'm thinking our economic system is sick too.

So: I'm evaluating ways to begin S1 and S2's apprentice adult training (both are on the cusp of the tween years) in what little time I have with them. Faith, attention to detail, pride in your work, use of authority, responsibility for oneself, and charity/grace. Pretty tall order, but Lord knows they aren't getting it at their mother's house or in the public school system.

Elusive Wapiti said...

@ Chris,

"What our schools do is create the illusion of order under which are winks and nudges allowing the kids to under perform.
Plus, the regimentation is too long, time wasted on more and more things that are less and less meaningful academically, including every sort of diversity/sensitivity/like that , complete with slogans hanging everywhere about fairness and what not."


Perceptive comment. Although you've been here a while, have you read Gatto's critique of public schooling? If not, you may wish to start here.

Order is good, but as a means, not an end, which, as you suggest above, is how the schooling system views it. Order, obedience, and conformity are the intended lessons taught.

And as mentioned before, the schooling curriculum is shot through with liberalist messaging from day one. No way I want to subject my son's impressionable young mind with that self-loathing (he is white and male) and vile claptrap.

Christina said...

Lee,

This is empirically refutable by watching those nations that are top performers. Regimented learning is actually more suited to boys if done right. Its the pedagogy that's the problem, not the order foisted.

Do you think they begin shoving boys in seats for 4 hours at a time at the age of 4?

Surely, at some point, we will have to adjust to a more disciplined approach to learning. But certainly not at such a young age.